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环亚客户端2020年06月06日01时00分40秒

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0aS5The world economy will suffer 】its\ wors/t year 【since】 the Great Depression of the 】1930s, The Inte/r【nati】onal \Mon】etary F\und 】has said i\n i/ts l】atest forecast.The IMF said on【 Tuesd】a【y that it e/xpec\ts the g\lobal economy to s【hrin】k 】b【y 3 percent this year. Thi】s is far w\orse than the dip of 0.1 p】er】cent in the rec/essi/on year of 】2009 after\ the \financial crash.The glo\bal economy i【s t\hen expected【 t/o rebound with a 5.8 per\c】\ent grow/th in 2021, but that outlook is【 un【certain.&l【dquo;This is an unprec/edented sh\ock. We have shutdowns of important se】ct\ors o】f th【e\ econ\omy. 】As you re/-open sectors, you start from a very lo\w base, bu\t ec【onomi\c activity【 gradually come/】s bac】k,” Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, de】puty dir【【ector of/ the IMF's research de\partment, told/ Eur/onews.The bl\eak assessment represents 【a breatht\aking downgrade by the IMF. 【In January, before the【 C\OVID-19 】outbreak /emerged as \suc【\h a grave gl\obal threat, the internat】ional lending organi/s【ation fore】cast modest growth of 3.3】 /p【【【ercent this year.Howev【er, far-re【aching measures to co【ntain the pandemic -- lockdown】s, tr\avel restriction\s】\, \busines】s shutdow】ns /and social dist\ancing -【- h【ave suddenly br】ought 】economi\c activity to a near】-standst/ill."Becau】se the economic fallout is acute in specifi/c sectors, po【licymakers will need to impl【ement substantial ta/rg【\et【ed/ fiscal, m\onetary, and f\】in【an】cial ma】rket me【as【ure【s to support affected ho【useholds and businesses domestically,"【 the IMF say】s.The IM\F say/s Europe -- the epicentre of the/ pandemic -- has been pa【rt【icularly \badly hit. Eco】nom【ic c/ontractions of\ 7.5 percent ar】e e\xpected in 【t\h【e eur\o zone's 19 countries, and 6.5 percent /in t\he United Kingdom.】&ldqu【o;\The reason for the very, very sharp downgrade c】om\pared to other 】countries is simply that the epidemi】\c h】as taken \a much larger tol/l】 so fa】r on Europe than/ it has on】 other parts of the world,&rdquo/; Milesi-Ferretti said in a\n inter\v/i【ew with\/ E\【urone【ws'】 busine\ss editor】 Sasha Vakul】ina.&ld/qu/o;T】his is why【 it is so ess】ential for governmen/ts t】o take/ really dracon】ian】 measures to keep firms from going bankrupt, to k/ee】】p workers from losing their wages\. This\ is/ also a very l【ar\g】e investment that yo【u are makin【g /int【o preparing/ t/he ec/onomy to res】】tart," h\e /said.】World trade i\s pr】ed\icted to\ plunge 【by 11 per【cent t【his【 year b【efore growing by\ 】8.4 【p/ercent in\ 2021.【The IM【F ac\compa【nies its foreca\sts\ with a warni\ng that there are many unknown factors: inc\luding t】he pa\t/h the virus will】 ta\k\e, the effectivenes/s of \policies take】n t/o cont】ain the outbr\eak an\】d l【imi【t the economic damage, and uncertainty over the situation severa/l /months fro【m now.Share\ this article【C【opy/paste the【 article video embed【 link below/:CopyShareTweetS】hares】endShareTweetShare\】se】ndMore/HideShareSendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou might also like\ 【 \ Coron】】avir】us in E【urope: How will the EU/ €5】00bn 【rescue deal help pe【ople and bu\sinesses? / / 【 \ / Coro\navir\us va】ccine: P\【h】arma giant】s\ G/S/K/ and S/anofi team up to【 find COVID-19 solution 【 【 Sur/vivors o】f cor】onavirus on their experience/ - and【 thei/r【 new perspective 【 / / 】 More aboutCorona\vir】usIMFFin\a【\n【cial /ai/dEcono】myHot 】Top\ic/Learn more about Coronav【irus Hot \To\picLearn more about/ Coronavirus / Browse today's/ tagsy59E

OxyEMussel fa/rms 】fight a\g【ainst【 pollution in \the Baltic; one of the \most polluted seas in the worldFet43IH9

RjlV“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Germ【an Chancellor/ An\【ge【la Merkel said she wants \her/ country to aim】 to neutralise gas \emissions by 2050, so as to be C】O2 neutral, but this has to be r【e/alistic.Mrs M【erkel spok/e a\t the Pe】tersberg C/limate Di/al【ogue co/nference on cli【mate change /tha/t t/ook p【lace in Berlin, and noted 【that she 【understands the desire to\ pr\ot\ect the\ environment."】/There are chi\ldren a/nd you】ng people\ around the /\world who d\emonstrate ev【ery 】【week so th】at\ th/ey 】can push for】 the prot】ectio【n \of the envir【onmen【t. They are pushing \all the politicia】n】s worldwide. To be hon】est, this is \n】ot /at all pl/easant, but\ I wa\n【t t】o\ stress that i【t is】 absol【ute/ly und/erstanda\ble," the German Chan/cellor sa【id. At the same time that global leaders and internat【【ional players d/iscussed the environment, G【reenpe\ace ac\t/ivists s【taged/ a protest at \the B】randenburg Gate,/ ca【lling f】or immedia】te measu/res."We mu/st take the right deci【sions for our future now, that's why we're here. T/o s/end a /clear message for a last chance as\ ti\me is running out," said Robin Miller.Ang\ela Merkel stressed that 】we【alth\y \countries that pollute the en/vironment more have the greatest responsibility t】o face up t/o clim/【ate change immediately.\Share t/h】【/is articl【e【Copy/past】e the \article video embed\ link be】low:Co\】py\Share【TweetSharesendShareTweetShares\endMore【HideShareSendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou might also lik】e 【 【】 】\ / 】 / Climate chan】ge: Responses to Merkel's\ vow【 to 】neutralise German'】;【s CO2 ar\e ambivalent 】 】 Carbon dioxide hits a level not】 】seen for 3 million 【y】ears. He】re&#Gra/pe skin leather\ is one of the】/ alternativ/es. \【39;s what that/ \me//ans for 【\climate c】hange — and 【humanity【. \ 【 【 】 【 Eight EU countries /【call for more ambitious strateg【y t\o tackle climat/e change / / \ \ More aboutGermany/Angela M/erkelclima】te】 【chang】e】climat/e p】rotestsEnvironme】ntal prot/\ectionGreenpeaceHot TopicLearn more\ ab【out / c】limate change /Hot TopicLearn \more about \ climate change / Br【ow【se today�】s】【 t【ags 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsgEkH

Tz8t】Du\bai an/d the United Arab Emir/a】tes are making anima\l con/se】\rvation a government priority at a time /when b】iodiversit\【y is unde】r threa\/t /and more anima】l】s fa【ce\ extinction globa/】l/ly.A re】port by the United Nations\ earlier this/ year claim\ed animal extinctio】ns are at an unpr/eced【en【t/ed high. Acco】rding【 to t\he organi】sa】ti\on, as many as one \m/illi【on species are under threat.On a visi\t to t【he 】desert, you/ 】might expect to f】ind ca/mels or】 antelope】, 【m】aybe \some /hawks.\ But Du】ba】i&rs\qu\o;s A】l Marmoom【 animal sanctuary 【】is/ teeming with 】biodiversi【ty with hundreds of differ【ent /species of】 birds, m【a/mmals, and rept【iles】.T【he sa/nctuary covers 20 percent of t】he whole area o/f Dubai. In the begin】ning, 】it\ was a desert popula\ted b/y nati\ve a【nimals, bu\t as the san\ctuar\y【 exp/anded \t】o m\ore than 50 oases, it was discovered/ these water bodi\es/ could cont【rol the environment【al b\alan/c\e.The sa\nctuary has even man】a/ged\ to at】tr【act the Arabian O】ryx. Thi】\【s an】i\mal w【as declared exti/n【ct in t【he w/ild in 1972, but has now been br】ought back from the\ b\r【ink by the reserve.Saoud F\aisal is a wildlife o\ffi/cer \at the】 Al Marmoom sanctuary. He says in the 80s an/d 90s the Oryx /wer】e o【verh\unted for food. Now t】he animal】 is cons\i【dered part o\f the r\egion's wildlife/】.&ld/quo;They are to/tally protected now/ an【d also they are he【althy,” he【 explains. “We have them in【 large numbers whic】h last year reached【 more tha【/n 500."From deser【t 【oases to in\door tropical environments, recent laws in Dubai mean gre/ater g】ove】rnment【al support for animal sanc/tuaries.Laws were introduced in 2007 to cover 【anima\l welfar\e, but awa【reness r】e/ally s】tart\ed\/ to build in 2016/. The laws /also apply to \rare and exotic animals.\ Some are /looked aft\】er in anim/al sanct/uaries like Green Pla/net.Everything about Gree【n Plane】t w】as de/si/gned specifically to 【create 】the ideal habitat for tropical 】p【lants】 a】nd a【n/imals in】 t】he mid】dle of the D】ubai de【ser【t】.The sanctuary house\s a wid【e range o【f /spe/cies including many diffe/rent birds, and ma\mmals such as two-toed】 slo\ths. And lizards l】ike gree/n/ iguanas or basi\lisks.The latest】 addition t/o /the Gree\n P】lanet family is a male Slow Loris /named/ Lo】nely by staff. But t【his wide- eyed, rare pr】imat\e wasn&【rsquo;t【】 lon】ely fo】\r long.As【 he is a critica/lly e】ndangered animal, the search was on to fin/d 【him a compan\ion, \A couple /of months later, a /female【 Slow Loris of the 【【same】 specie【s was also res/cued. These animals【\ mate for 【lif【e 【and\ af/ter they wer/】e int/roduced to each 【oth【e/r【 a【ppea【red to 】get along w/e】ll,【 】raising/ hopes there may 】be a baby Slow\ Loris/ in the near fut\ure.Sh\ar\e this articleCopy/paste the article 【vi】deo 【embed link below:CopyShar/eT\weetShares/e/ndShareTweetS】ha】resendMoreHi/deShareSe【ndSh】areShareShareSe/n【dShareShareYou might also【 like\ 【 【 The appeti/te for local sustainable 】food【 /produce in the Un】/ited Arab Emirates 【 【 】 / / \ \ Dubai acts t】o ste/m the tide of single use pl【astic \ \ 】 【 \ New era 】for Benidor\m as resort embraces sustainabi/lity / /】 / Mor【e aboutEnvir/onment/al prot【ecti/o\nFa\una and FloraD】ubai United Arab Emirates Most viewed Beijing is their cam【\pu/s/: Inside the 【Ch\/in\ese capita【l’s li/fe-c】hanging/ study tour】s \ 【 】 【 \ 9/ places to vi/sit on your cul\tural trip around\ Croatia / 】 The Palm Jumeirah: Dubai's sy【mbol of creati【vit】\/y and ambition 】 Marke【ts,/ coffee an/d stre\/e】t art: d【i\scovering Zagreb's secret delights 】 / Gr【eek is】lands of history and culture 】 \ 】【 Browse/ today's tagsz1PO

Xz2MGreta Thunberg\, \the 16-year-old cli【mate activ/is【t who h】as inspired stud\ent protes【ts \across the gl【/obe, has set off to the United States this week in an env【ironmentally\-friendl】y yacht.But her【\ two-week voyag\e a】cross t】he Atlantic will be 】no ple【asure c【ruise.She /will ins\tead】 be on a \high-tec\h racing/ yacht as she travels to UN clima【te summits next 【month 】】in New【 Y】ork and in Santiago, Chile, in December."Of course, it's going to】 be c【hallenging for everyone on the】 \boat/, probably that is what you have to expect】. "There are always goi\ng to be【 people who don't under\sta【nd /or don'【t【】 ac\cept the s/cience【.&ldqu】o;I w】ill just ignore 】them because,【 I mean, I'm only acting and communicating o】n the scie【nce, and 】if they don【't like that then, /I mea【【n, what have 】I g【ot to do a】bout that\?"Hig【/hlight/ing the urgency o】f cutting carbon \emissions, the y【oung Swe\de last month announc\ed she would no lon\】ger fly to envir】\onment】al conferences.Pierre Casiraghi, the /gra/n】【dso】n of 】Monaco's late P【rince Rain/ier III and Amer】ican act/ress Grace Ke】lly, helpe/【d her】 k【\e】\ep that pledge 】by o\ffering her pas【】sage】 on a racing ya】【cht.Sailing on the\ 60-foot (18-metre) Maliz/ia I【I, outfitted with solar pane】ls and underwater turbines to gener】ate elec】t\ricity】, Th/【unberg will make a zero-carbon tra【ns-】Atlanti】c /journey.But to call it】 a 'no-frills' pas】sag/e 【would be an understateme\nt.The sailboa\t i】s \built for high-speed, offs/hore racing, with weight kept to a】 minim】um.The o】nl】y alterations f【or the voyage are fit/ti【ng curt【ains in front of the\/ bunk a】nd ad【ding mattr】esses \f【or comfor/t.T】here is no \toilet or fixed【 shower, \a sm/】all gas cooke\r 】and the food will be freeze-dried.Share t【h\is article/Co】py/paste th】e articl/e v【ideo embed link \below:/CopyShareTweetSharesend/ShareT【\weetSharesendMo/reHideShare【Se】n】dS/hareShareSha】reSendShareS/hare/You might【 also lik/e Watch again: Greta Th【unberg joins clima\te prote】】st ou【t\side United /Na/tions HQ \ 【 / 【 / 【 Plans for Heathrow a【】ir【p【ort third runw【ay in/ doubt a\【fter \court ruling on【 c】limate c【hange】 】 【 】 Watch:\ Cli】mate change protesters bid to s【t】op in】coming 【PM Boris Johns【on \ 】 【 More aboutGlobal warming and climate changeEnvironmental protect/ionAir \pollutionHo\t TopicLea【/rn more about】/ Globa/l war【ming a】nd c【limate ch\ange\ Hot】 TopicLearn more a/bout Global\/ warming and 】climat】e chang\e \ / 】 Bro/\wse\ today's ta\gsNR02

More preparation time and p\eople obeying \con/finem/ent measures has helped Portugal manage its co【ronavirus o/ut/break, it's been claimed.Por】tugal h\as vastly di】fferent COVID-19 in【fecti\on and death rates/ com【pared /to【 n\eighbouring Spain, one of the \worst hit countries.【 Pulmonologist Dr【/ F/ilipe Froe】\s, an advisor to health chief Graça Frei】tas, said/ Portugal ha/d 】benef\i/ted 】f【rom being【 b/ehind Madrid in【 t/erms of the virus\'\ spread. Th\is, he adde】d, had given the/ country time to get hospitals ready【】 and \increase capacity in inte\nsi\】ve ca【re units."The differ【enc】e 【in Portugal was that we/ had more time to/ prepare," Dr Froes told Euronews' Good Morning Europ/e 【sho】w."We think we are three weeks behind】 Italy 】and pe】rhap【s one w\e/ek a/【【nd a half \behind Sp/ain, s】o thi【s gave【 us time,\ precious days, to prepare.\ I】 think\ the main differ】ence was\ also the early e/【n\gag\ement of primary ca\re physicians."Portugal】 declared 【a state of emergency o】n 18 March, just two da/ys after 【】the first COVID-19 deat【h wa\s reported.At the t/ime of【 】\writing, Portugal has confi】rmed 535 C】OVID-19 deaths, w\hich wo【rks out as 52 per one million】 o】f population.\ In Spain, m/ore than 18,000 have been /killed by the disease, giving it a r\ate of 385 fatalities for【 【each one milli【】on in\hab【itants.Madr\id's i\nfection rate is also double that of Lisbon's, al\though this measure can be skewed by ho【w muc\h 【test/ing a country c\arries out.Fr【eitas, Portug】a\l's \director general for health【, said /88 per c】ent\ of t/he country's confirmed ca\ses a/re s\taying at hom【e an/】d don'】t /re【/qu\i/re\ hospit【al treatmen/t. 【】"T】he \hospitals are not overwhelm/ed and we /have more t】ime【 and more [better] cond【itions to follow the c\ritical pat】\ients in the ICUs," she said."The data we have indicates that the maximum of our po/【tential ha【s not yet been r】eached,\ which reflects the evolution o\f /the epidemic.\"'【Unsurp/asse/d civic\ spirit'A study from t【h/e Nova Universit\y of 【Li/sbon indi】cates /the reproduction of C】OVID-19 in/ Port/ugal was 【 the low】es\】t in Europe during the first 25 day【s of the epidemic.Dr F/ro】es believes/ citizen ob\edien/ce has been cru\cial in 【prev】enting further spread 】of \the vir\us."【Most activities are closed,【 such\ as s【chools and commerci】al activiti】es, a/nd most people 【are 】usua\lly\ following the rules and we apply the \recommendations of th\e governmen【【t/," h【e 】said.Eduardo Cabrita,\ Portug\al's minister of in/ternal a】dmini/strati/\on, sai【【d Por【tuguese citizens 】showed "unsurpassed civic spirit" in com【plying with regulations\ over the 】Ea】ster weekend."S\ecur】it【y f/orce/s report very \lo】w levels of circulation of citizens \an\d widespr【e/ad a】dherence to recommend【at】i/ons."On Friday, Presi\dent Marcelo Re//】belo de】 Sousa pr/oposed /extending the national lockdown/ beyond 17 April, until 1 M/ay.Bu\t d【espite promising s【igns】, officials 【are/ warning it may st\ill be 【early to【 【e\val【uate Portugal's【 response to the coro/n【a】virus."The are/a of &\#8203;​housin】g 】in \residentia】l homes a【nd their workers】 is identified as o【f 】particular【 c【once/\rn 】and priority【 for a【ction【," said Cabrita.\Authorities fear the/ d\isease could sp】read rapidly through【 care homes as it【 has in ot/her/ parts of Euro\pe.B【ut Portug】al has take/n huge steps \to 】co【ntain the vi】rus, repatriating around 4/,000 citizens f\rom abro/ad.The Portug【uese go】v\ernment has also gran/ted citiz\en】ship】 rights/ to mi【grant\s and asylum seekers who have residency applications underway.The move was intended 】to ensur/e】 mor\e \people】 in the countr【y c/an access】 so】c】ial security and health care】.Share 】this/ articleCopy/paste 】/t/he article video embed\ link below:CopyShareT】w\【eetSharese【n/dShareTwe\etSharesendMoreHideShar/eSendShareShareShareSe/ndShare【Share【You might als/o lik】e 】 Coronavirus】 in Europe: Latest numbers o【n【/ COVID【-1【9 cases and deat\hs / 【【 / 】 】 / 】 】 \ \ Coron/avirus【 /in Eu\rope:【 Spain allows part】ial re】turn to wo】rk as casu【alty figures im/prove 【 \ \ 】/ 】Co【ronavirus【: Portuga\l/ 【grants temporary citize\nship /rights to migrants 【 【More aboutPortu/galCoronaviruslockd】ownEmer/genc【ySpainC【OVID-19Hot TopicLearn more\ about Coronavirus】 】 Hot\【 TopicLearn more about / 】 Coronaviru/s Browse toda/y\9【;s tags

VKWzLife under /t】he s【ea【 is at risk\. I】nternational tar】gets for pro\tecting /biod/iversity appear t/\o\/ be out of reach/. By 2020】, 】countries w【ith a co\astline must 】】esta【blish【 Marine Protected/ Areas (MPAs) to ensure the conservation of wildlife\ and flora. According to a stu//dy by the WWF, 】the European Union is far from leading the way/."We have 23 M/ember S【ta\tes w\ith marine area in the EU. 1】9 of these】【 are under the %【 limit of 【hav\ing effective mana/】gement /\for 】protected areas and w/ith just【 one year to go. And what's even mor【e alarming is tha/t half of the【m, 1//1 of them, have no 【manage【ment pl【ans what【soever, de\veloped or reported," exp【lai【ns Jani】ca Borg, Mari】ne Protecti\o【n an】d Spatial Plann】in\g Policy Coordinator a【t the WWF/ Europea】n Policy Office an/d lead author.EU \countries should/ set aside nearly 12% of their marine areas 】as mari【ne protected are】as. But according to the\ NGO, the bloc's share curr】ently accounts for less t】han 2%."I【'm d\isappoi\nted because fr/om the point o\】f】 view o\f the fishing industry marine prot/ected ar/eas offer /g】reat opport【unities to provid\e nurseri/es\ fo\r fish 【an/d to allow the fish to become\ bigger.\【 And/ as we know bigger i\s be】tter beca//use 】big fish breed in/ more numbe\rs. So ma【r/ine p/r\o【tecte/d are\a】s, /10】%, 15%, provide a g【r/eat bac\kground for 【a fish/ing in\dustry," Chr/is DAVIES (UK), Member of the Eur\opean Parliament,\ Renew Europe gro】up, cha】ir of the Comm】itte\e 【on Fisheries told Euronews.The protection o\f b【iodi\ver\sity varies from\ one ma\ritim】e area【 to another\. Addi【tio【nal efforts are needed\ in the Mediter【ranean and th】e Bl\【】/ack Sea. Without the】se】 marine pro【tected areas, \th/e survival of our oc/】eans is at risk.Share this articleCopy/paste】 the 【】arti【cle video/ \embed link be】【low:【Co【pyShareT/weet\SharesendShar/eTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareSh\areShareSendShareSh/areYou m/ig/ht 】al【so like 】 /Watch:/ Rescuers /save Orcas stranded on Argen【t【in】e b】each / 【 / E【U fis】h quota \quarrel -【 min【isters】 hail d【eal, NGOs/ 【sl//am overfishi】ng】 【 【 \/\ / 【 The/ Battle for】 /Brussels roads 【 \ More aboutEnv【i\ronmenta\】l protectionPollutionWWF 】 Browse today】's tags2DZt

NkoTText si【zeAaA\aHaving cricket tacos or fried Man\churia/n scorpi/ons on the menu of your favourit【e organic and susta【in【able resta\/【urant ha/s a pr】etty good 】chan【ce in 】the futu【re.【 E【dible insects are on/ the/ r\i】se, t【hey are becomin】g more and more popular f【or nu【tri】tion】a】l/ reasons\ and f/or environmen/tal b/enefits./\According to a r】e/port of Global Market Insights,【 the global edible\ i【ns】ects market s/\ize is /expect】ed to grow f/r【om o/ve【r $】55 mi【llion in 27 to】 over 0 million by 2024.In 】the We【stern part of the】 wo】rld, the gastronomic argument is on the go wh】ile many】 hig】h-e】n】d r】estaurants joine】d it alr\eady, such as the multiple winner of the Wo】rld’s B【est Restaurant, Noma】 in Copenhagen, which h】ad become widel】y kno/wn for its efforts to make】】 in【sects as an acc】eptable food】 fo【r th\e futu\re. Another temple of hi【gh-en/d g】astronomy, S&atil】de;o Paulo&rsqu/o;s D.O.M., ranked the ninth best re/staurant in】 the】 】world】, made headlines a fe/w years ago by s】erving a r\aw/ Amazo\nian leaf-c/utter ant on a pi\\neapple cube.In an era in which】 concern o\ver the world'【s climate only c\ontinues to grow deep【er/, experts 】are re】g【ularly encouraging extreme and pe】rhaps even creative action. Hence advocates of/ edible in/sects ar\e singing the/ en/vironmental】 benefits of s\prinkli【ng your di】she【s 】【with crickets, grasshopp\ers and ant【s】.B】ugs p【ack a lot of protein and minerals but take 【far f\/ewer reso】urces /to produce than animal meat/.Click on the vi\deo above 】to learn more abou\t 】the\ high-end ins】ect dishes 【serv/ed in New York City/.S】ha】r\e\ this 】\article / \ More from wellnessPyBI

OkcnMEPs ba/ck initiati\ve to reduce p/lastic waste a\n\d improve water qualityCScA

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73IZPaulino Guajajara,【 a/ member \of【 an indigenous group/ i/n no/rthern\ B/ra【zil, was shot dead in an 】ambush by 】illegal loggers \o】n Frida\y a】ccording to\ /leaders of the Gu【ajajara tribe.T\hey\ said on【 S【atu/rday /that Pauli【no was\ hunting ins\ide the Arariboia res/e\rvat\ion in Ma/ranhao st\ate 】when he was attacked and s】hot in the head.An/other member of his t】ri】be, /Laercio Guajajara, w【as injured【/ \but managed to 】escape.The /clash comes 【ami\d an\ increase in \invasions of res【/ervations by 【il】leg//al loggers since Pre】sident Jair Bol/son【【ar\o t/】ook office. Elected 【this year, the president vowed t\o open up protected】 ind/igenous lands to eco\nomic development.Brazil's pan-indigenous\ organisation, APIB, said Bolson【aro's rhe】to/ri/c】 has en】】coura\ge】d violence \against indigenous \g】roups. "T/he increase/ in violence in i【】ndigenous terri/】to\ries is a】 direct result of his hateful speeches and steps tak】en against our people,"Th【e Guaja\ja】ras set 【up the Guardians of t/he Forest in 2012 to】 patrol the vast reservat\ion 】since they c/oul】dn't rely o【n po/lice to defend them/ from invasions.APIB s\】aid that Paulino's body is still lying in the forest where/】 he/ was 【shot. Police】 h【ave sent a tea】m to investigate the/ 【ci】/rcumsta】】nces of his death】\.Paulin【o spok\e to R【euters ne】ws agency earlier this year an】d s【】aid th】at protectin】g the forest from i【】ntr【uders/ was dangerous but that his pe【【opl【e could not give in t【o fe【ar【【."I'm sca【red at \tim】es】, but we have to 】lift up our heads and act.\ We\ are her】e fighting," he said."We /are protecting our land 【and the lif】e on 】/it,【 the \animal】s, \the birds, even t\he Awa who are here too," Paul】ino Guajajara said【 a/t the time. "There 】is so much destruction o【\f Nature happening, good tr】ees with wood\ as hard/【 as st】eel being cu\t down/ and taken away." "We have 【】to pres【erve 】this life f【or our children'\s future," he 】said.Share this ar/t】icl】eCopy/paste the article 【】video embed /lin\k below:Co【pySh\areTw【eetS】harese】n/dSh】ar【eTweet/Sharesend】/MoreHid】eS/ha【reSendShareShareSh】areSendShareShareYou might also like 【 Oil tanker【 owner denies causing ma【ssive】 spill off Brazi】【l's coast / / / / \ \ 【 Ama/zon chief fight\ing to 【protect rainforest p/【ut fo【rw/ard for Nobel Priz\】e / / 】 / / \ Ind/igenous Braz【ili\【ans protest ag/ainst President B】olsonaro’s land r\eforms/// / More abou/tBr】azilIndigenous peoplesEnvironme】【ntal protectionFore】stsClim【ateHot TopicL/earn more ab【【ou/t Climate Hot T/opi/cLearn more about Climate 】 Browse tod/ay【9;s tagshItV

S7OHText si【zeAaAaThe common hippo】p【o/ta/mus is know\n for th\eir /rapacious appetites and spending a lot /of/ time/\/ in water, no wond】e【r, 'river hor【se is the literal En】glish translation o\f【 the Greek word Hipp【opotamus/. T\hey spend up to 16 ho/ur/s a day submerg】e【d in rive/rs and la】kes to keep their massive bodies cool under th/e hot African sun. And in t//he rest of /their】 time? They consume】\ bet/ween 25-40 kilos of grass.And with【 these two \act【ions, they already do a lo【t for th/ei【r env/iro【nmen/t. A recent study b\/y /University of Antwerp 】biolo】g\ist J\onas Schoelynck and his/ 】col/leagues, published in Scienc【e Ad/vances found hippo/' daily hab【its pl/ay a key role in maintainin/g】 e/co】syste【ms. Th\【e scientists fo】und out about their key r/ole【 by/\ /】analysing s/ample/s from the Mara R\iver, which runs throu【gh t】he Maasa/i Mar【a National Reserve, a savann\ah in Kenya.The mam//mal】s living in this park are protected, h【oweve】r\, ou/tsid/e o】f t】hese a/r\ea/s scient/ist\s sa/y h\ippo numbers/ are down. The IUCN Red \List describes the hippos as vulnerable and now scientists are war/ning 【tha】t t\h/e dw【indling number of hippos across A/fr\ica/ \is potentially harmful to the continent's /rivers and la/k】es.Clic/k on the video a/bove to see how hippo\s make th】e ecosystem run around them.Share this article More \/f】rom pl】acesW00K

B2YoWhat if】\ 】/】we use】d the sea to diver\s/\if//y the stock of a/vailable biofuels?Resear\chers in Aarhus, De\nm【a\rk, are developing a fin【ancially via】ble process that does 】just that/.An ordina\ry ca】r is used to test the seaw【\eed fu【e\l, whi【ch scientists ca//ll a 3rd generation biofuel, and is a sustainable alternative to f/oss\il fuel】s.The tank is filled w】ith 10% seaweed fuel,】 the rest with petrol】 and its performance is compared with gas station fuels."The/ e【missions we 【meas【ure are CO, C【O2, and NOX. And \addi】tionally, we are measuring th/e pa/rticula/te emissi】on】s from th】e car,"/ sa\ys Sten Frand\sen - mechanica/l【 e【ngineer and busin】e【ss【 manage】r at DT】\I."The emission te】sts we got fr】om/ the seaweed】 fuel is on exactly the 【s【ame level /\as wha\t w】e \get from the \r】eferen/ce fuel."Sea【weed biofuel 】does not e/mit less CO2,\/ but \unl/ike \petrol, it extracts CO2 from the a\tmosphere while \gro【wing.\The】 researchers plan t\o \increase 】the portion 】used in the engi】ne tank, convinced that w【e will switch 】to biofuels in 【the upcoming years."We see】 a lot of el\ectrical cars entering the m/】arket, b】ut is that a one fix-all solution for /the CO2/ em【ission【s?" asks\ Frandsen."\Because we have hea【vy-duty tran】/\sport, we have sh】i】ps/ we have aerop/lanes,/ still c】onsuming a large amount of fossil fuels. We \nee】d 】a subst】i/tute for tha】t, and maybe\,【 seaweed co【uld be\/ som/e of the【 soluti【【on【".Why /is seaweed sustainabl\e? 【First, be\caus【e it /grows 】everywhere. It only needs the su\n and the sea,// which covers 70% of ou\r planet】.Its cultivation does not /requir【e any arable 】la\nd, 】fertilizer or freshwater/,/ like othe】r\ biof\u【els made out of/ agricultural \r\esidues for exam\ple.But 】how can 【this new fu\el be produced on an industrial 】s/cale? /This is the ch\allenge of 】a European re】search【 pr】oject c/alled Mac/roF/uels.Scien\【tists at the laboratory【 in P/etten, Nether【lands, 】are /searching f【o】r the best way t\o convert/ seaweed sug\ars to f\ue【ls.In/ some specie/s, this can r/【epres【ent up 【to 60% of\ the plant.【In /the l/】ong term, th/ey woul/d no l\onger】 have to produce bot/tles, /b\ut tons of 】ethanol and butanol barrels.】 S】til\l follo】wing a rat\her basi【c process\:"First /w\/e t】ake s\eawe/ed. And t\hen we use wa/ter to get the suga/rs】 out with some enzymes or acids," says Jaap Van 【Hal, a 【chemist &am\p; i【n\【n\ovation manager at b】iorefin/ery, TNO and macrofuel p/roject scie【ntific coordinat】o】r."\A】nd then you \get a sugar solution, and j/ust like you\ pr【oduce wine or beer, you f\er】ment it to /Ethanol or But\anol, and you blend t/hat with normal ga\soline or d【iesel to pr\oduce E10 \and t/hen you 【drive y/our car \on i】t."More biofuel/ production means more /se/aweed biomass. Th/anks to economies of scale an/d mechaniz/at/ion, res/e\archers\ h/ope to cut the fue\l produc【tio/n costs by 100 per cen】t.T【oget【her with comm【ercializi】ng oth/er】 seaweed 【products【, this could make fuels economically\ feasible in the future."When we started】 the p【roject a couple o\f year/s /ago【/, we were working】 with square meters. Today we are do【in\g hectares, 【and in t【he \near future, we will go in the squar/e kilometre range," says Bert Groenendaal【/, a chemist & R&a/mp;/D project coo/rdinator at】 \】SIOEN.T】o/day】, th\e pr】ice 】of a l\itre【 of seaweed-based biofue\l \is /way to\o high, probably a】 /hundred times more expensi】ve than traditi/o】nal fuels. But when the scale will go up, the p】rice will \g】o down, and we【 will\ get into a ran\ge where we will/ be comp\etitive with tr\aditional /fuels."Based】 on the exa\mple of the w】i【nd secto【r, scientists estimate】 t【hat it will take around 25 \years for the technology to be p\r】ofitable on 【a very large scale.1212Ad【dition\al\ so】urces\ •【 Edi/tor,\ Christele Ben Al\iShare this articleCopy/pas】te\ the /article video embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharese【ndShareTweetSharesendMo】reH\ideShar\eSe/ndShareShareShareSendShareS【h【areYou might also lik】\e \】 Could jellyfis】\【h be the a【nswer to fighting o/cean pol/l\ution? 【 】】 / / / / / Liquid windows and the energy-ef】ficient bu【ildin【gs of tomorrow \ More ab\outCarsFuelResearchEcologyEn【vironm\ental protecti/on/ \ Most viewed 【 What influence on climate is\ t\he corona】virus 】lock/down /really havi】n/g【? 】 / / 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】pr\ema/ture babies \from infe【ction / \ Messen【ge/r RNA: the /molec\ule 【that\ may teach our 】bodie/s to beat cancer 【 / 【 \ 】 \ 】 Apple and Google【 say they&#;ll work togethe】r【 to trace spread of】 coronavirus via /sm】artph】o【nes【 / How EU funding is cha/n【ging the/ f【a【\】ce of Latvi/an innovation 】 / 【 】 Browse】\ to\da【y'】;s tagsvbOC

6kHT\Is o\ne week en\ough?【 0 m【edia outle\【ts【 dedicate \】news to climate 】changeYom5

IV5QOver 4,500 peo\ple \planted some 20,000 tree\s i/n /the【 P\ortug】uese capital on \Sun】day.The\ initia\tive was L【is/bon'\s fir【】s【t a】s the European G【reen Capita/】l 202【0.The city is 【aiming to be a hundred percen\t carbon-neutral by 2【050 and aims\ to【 p\lant 1/00,000 trees thr\oug/h】out t】he year."Tree planting helps【 to c【oun/teract\】 one of t】h【e mos/t 】negative effects of cli\mate/ change and global wa】rm\ing, \whic/h is the heatwav【es," Lisbo/n Mayor Fernando【 Medina told repo【rter/s. "When th/ese kinds of ar【eas are 【planted, 】the surrounding【 temperature can drop by three to five degrees centigr\a】de."Apart fro\m【 the 【tit/le,\ Lisbon won a financial prize of/ 350】,000 e\uros from the【 Europea\n \Com/miss/ion】 to kick-start its green capital year.】】"Get organized 【as you hav】e /been 】but【 even mor】【e so 【that you force us the politicians t\o do the right things," European Com/mission/ Vice-【President/ Fran【s Timme\rmans t\old the /audience at the opening】 】c\e【remony to launch the Lisbon initiative.Time to end the【 war\ on natureAt the same c\eremony th【【e UN】 S】ecretary-General, Anton【i\o Guterres, who is Port\uguese, said it was time to get serious about the plane】t./"【\This /ye【ar, in 2】020, we must pr【ovide【 the p【roo/f t【hat we want to end the war】 th/【at humanity ha\/s launched against nature," said Guterres】.Portugal's pres】ident, Marcelo Rebe】lo de \Sousa, says his cou【/ntry】 is betting on green, betting】\ on the environment【 and betting o\n facing 【clima\te change a【\nd \g\loba\l war\ming.To that end, Lis】bo】n will be launching en【vironme【ntal initiatives t【hroughout 2020.Share this artic】l\eCopy/paste the articl/e 】video embed【 link belo\w:C\opyShareT【weetSharese【ndShareTwee】tShares】【endMoreHideSh】areSendShareShareSh/are\SendShareSh\areYou might also like 】 】 \ 【 Land ahoy! Greta Thun】berg arrives in Lisbon \/after Atlantic cr】ossing /【 【 【 Want to fig\ht climate ch/a【nge? Start with challenging your/ mayor and【 your /neighbo【urs 】t【o act【 ǀ 】View \ \ 】 \ 】 \ 】】 The EU co\uld face a wo\r】se p】andemic than COVID-19 if it 】waters down its Green Dea】l ǀ View 】 【 】 Mo】re aboutEnvironment/al【 protectionclimate changeGlo/【bal wa\rming and climat【e】 changeLi/【sbonClim】\ateHot TopicLearn mo\/re about 】 Glo\bal \warmi【ng and climate change Hot Topic】Learn more about Glo/bal warming a】nd cl【imate chang/e 】 / Browse】 today's t】agsDOL6

wAotTex\【t size\AaAaIn a historic \m】ove for the/ /east A/frican nation, Ethio【p【ia 】has this】 week announced a tree-p/lan】ting/ initia【tive, vi】a/ UN Environment, to outd\o vir【t/ual】ly any/ ot\he【r country in the world. Based /initially at the Gu】le/le Botanical Garden in the capital of Ad/dis Ababa, volunte/ers \be\gan pla】nting 350 million tr\ees 】spanning r\ight across the country. In\ just /12 hours, the world record was broken, in an \ad】m/irable attempt to combat the effects of】 de\fo】restatio】n a/nd cli】【】mate change. By fu【】l/fill\/in【g\ the tree-plantin/g re】cord,/ th【e】 c】ountry is surpassing i/ts Green Legacy goal, 【conceived by Eth】io】】pian】 Pr/ime Minister/ A\】b】iy Ahmed, o/f pla\/nting 2“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207How to have a fl\ying free holida\y and】 【reconnect wi/th natur】e 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tags million tr】ees\ in a day【 at over 1,】000 sites.The /l/ast country \to attempt【 su【c\h a feat was India, who have been reigning\ cha/mpi【on】s since 1 when they planted 49.3 million trees in\ just one【 day, invo【lving 800,000 vo】lunt【eers. Equally, back【 in/ /2018, China announced plans to 【plan\t forests c\overing an area rou【ghly the size of /Ireland and the UK, one of the least\ forested countries】 in Europe \(13% according t【o /Forest R【esearch), spent 】£.7 million to develop a new north】【ern forest 【】in 20【【18. Co\uld the trend o/】f countries competing /\to plant the mo/st saplings be catching on?】E/thiopia's Prime Min/ister Abiy A【hm/ed, A/ugus\t 2019ReutersThe United /Nations En【】vi】ronment】, al\o】\ng with ot\her international organisati【ons, all backe\d the initiati】ve, believing firmly in the /power of tree rest】oration\ in //helpi\n】g to a/bsorb carbon dioxid】e, a m/ajor propell】er\ of global heati\ng./What is Aff【ore【station and /why does it】 help the p】lanet?Tr\ee-planting is called 】afforestation, quite\ simply, the op】posite】 o【【f deforestation. Many studies, 】including o【ne conducted by A/】merica/n scientific journ【al PNAS in 2017\, hav\e document【【\ed /that restoring forest\s in】 their natural f】or\ms is】 \one of, if not the s【in】gle mos】t, efficient an【swer to】 improving global wa\rming.Acco】rdin/g to the UN, f】orest \coverage in Ethiopia has d/eclined drastically since the/ start of the century, reaching a \l】ow of just 4% i】n the early\ 2000s【, /as opposed to 35% 【100 years ago. So, ac/tion had to be take】n to improve 】the /leve\l \of 【e/missions in the atmosph【ere, i/n the】 form of this ambitious】 task.Wh【at h\appen\s is, /trees and vege\tatio\n absorb t\he excess carbon dioxid】e \】we emi\t due \to human a\ctiv【ity with fossil fuel】s,\ meani】n\】g tha\t th\e CO2 c\an be st【ored, and the heat absorbed. In this way, the he\ating of t【he planet【 is lessened and, in turn, the tr【ees he/lp to preserve /the ec【osystems be/neath th/em/【\ and ensure si/gnificant e】nvironme】nta【l benefits/ as a who\le. F/or \instance, en\c/ou\raging rainfall, pr\oviding clean water, r】edu【ci/ng air pol【lution,】 and impr/ov】ing the livelihoods for local peopl\e in s/urr】ounding areas.Nature\ Va【lley\, AfricaJuliette B【iao Koudenoukpo,\ Dir【ector of UN\ Environment&rsq】uo;s Africa Office explain/【s in an official statemen/t:&\ldquo;Afforestation is t\he most ef\fective climate cha】nge 】solution to date a\nd with the ne/w record set by Ethiopia, other African na】\tio】ns should move with speed and chal\lenge the status quo.&【rdquo;“Africa has what 【it take/s to spearhead thi\s glo【bal pu/sh and as the most affected and v【ulnerable c\ontinent, \clim【ate cha/nge miti/gation must 】be \the\ \t/opmost pr/io】rity in the comi【ng da】ys. We at【 UN Environment are taking the lead\ in helping to build capacity 【for\ nations and people to 】ap【ply/ /th\emselves to afforestation and climate chang/\e mitigation strategies.”353,633,6/60 Tree Seedlings Pl】an/ted in 【12 Hours. This【 is/【 i/n /【#Ethiop\iansRegional Shares of T】rees Pla\nted toda\y.#P】MOEthiopi/a#Green】LegacyEthiopiapic.twitter.co】m/2BkTD/tYedC&mdas//h; D【r.-Ing.【 Geta\hun Mekuria (@DrGetahun) July 29, 2019Ultimate\ly, t/he goa\l is f\or 4 b\illion【】 ind】igenous trees to be planted /acr/o/\ss the dr/o】ught-prone nation, rep\orts the BBC, w/hich will make 【an en\ormous difference to t【he】 stability of the【 climate.Share this article More from pla】cesbEdD

hbR2\Is o\ne week en\ough?【 0 m【edia outle\【ts【 dedicate \】news to climate 】changecFf9

QM3PCan corals i/n Jordan sa\ve ot【her reefs from g【lobal warming?bGvK

BRBpDubai&r】\squ/o;s airports ha\ve banned all single\ use plastics as t【h\】e city works towards a plas/tic-free futur】e.It comes as the attitu/de/ towards si】ng\l】e use plastics /i\/s changi\ng./ In Dubai, 90 pe】r cent of peop】le say they are making a conscious effor/t\ to reduce their own plastic waste consumption】.Nearly fo【ur in five say t\hey rec/ycle more no/w than they d/id five years a\go. A\n/d one in four people say they're en】couraged to recycle more by corporations championin【g pla】】stic-free initiatives.Dubai Inte\rnational 【Airport \along with Dubai W】orl\d Ce\ntra】l welcome a/lmost 9】0 million passeng\【ers each y/\ear【. B\//ut with 【those passengers comes 5,/5【Soybean\ s【kiwear is th/e new plan】t-ba/【\sed tre【nd of 2020 tonnes of pla/stic.The airports】&r/squo; operator, /Dubai Airports, banned all single use plastics from 【inside the terminal a】t 【t\he beginning of】 this year/.Th】at【 means that plastic cutle【ry, water bottle【s, dri【nking straw】s/, packaging and polythene bags are all banned from cafes and【 rest\aurants.Eugene Barry, D】ubai A\irp\orts’ executi【ve vi/c【e /president (commercia】l), told F/ocus: 】&ldqu】o;\Ni/nety f【i】ve per \cen【t of our partners have actua】lly made the pledge to switch from plastic to appropriate and re】levant substi\tutes for 【som/e of the pr/oducts that are used in catering and/ 】r【etail a【\cross the airport.”【The /operator hope】s it】's a strategy that m/ight become a\ t】em【plate for o\/t/her major transpo\rtation h】ubs and bus【inesses】.“Thi【s is ver】y much 】/the early stages of a long/ journey, I 【believe, t【o h\/ave a more e【nvi【ronmentally frie/ndly ap【proach /to managing bu【/【\sines】ses,&\rdquo; Barry said.\To see the a/mount of plastic that's building up in our s【and an【d in our oceans is jus\t cr】azy. Tom Arnel, Common\ Gro】unds founder】【 】 / \ Dubai&】rs/q】uo;s 700 h【otels are already【 look\in【g \【【at alternati【v\es, s/uch as switching\ water bottles from plastic to glass/.Plastic key cards could a/lso be a thing of /the /pa】st, as develop】ers /【l【ook i/nto switc\hing them to wood-b/ased materials.The eco packagin\g company Avani is one firm offering plast\ic-f/ree】 a/lte/rn】atives, including a bag 】made from cassa\va, 】a ch】eap and common 】root【 vegetable.The ma【terial is bio/【deg/radable a【nd compostable/, breaking down over a perio【d of month/s on land【 or】 at【 sea.Peter Avram, 【\man【】agin【】g director of Avani Middle East, sai/d: &/l】dqu/o;Until /a 【couple【 of years ago we had no 【major solutions, pa/rt/icularly for 】the bag.&】rdquo;Bu【t the cassava b】ag, a 】mixtu】r\e of starch, vegeta\bl/e oil /and organix r/\e】sins, has changed the equation.Avram】 said the 【product has helped re/duce t/he 】use of plastic bag\【s by mor\e than 50 per\ c\en】t.To【m Arnel, founder of the Comm【on /Grounds coffee c】hain, is on【e 【company ma】king 】the sw【itch【.“As a father of three kids, I take【 my family to t【he beach all the /ti/me 【and t/o see the 】amount of/】 \plasti\c th【at's building u/p in o】ur sand and in our ocea】ns i/s just crazy.&rdq】uo;His\ company has 】ph】\a】/sed out pl\a/stic c【ups and bowls.“We serve 【th【ousands【】 of 【cust/omers a week and every little bit【】 that we /can do really 【does go 【a long way 】to help the situ/at【ion. 】It's just\ 】about mak【ing sure that you do the work to\ understand where the single u\se pl/a/【stic is. All \of our plastic cups【, all/ of our takeaway 】bowls and p】lates and cutlery, you know, 】replenishing those 【a】reas of o\ur kit【chens with t】hings that we kne\w【 work great fo/r the environment.&rd【quo;Arnel s\aid the feedback 【f\ro/m customers had b【ee【n “amazin【g”.&ld】quo】;As l【ong as 】everyon\e's d】oi【n/g t】heir bit an【d understanding their/ impact, /we should 】be】 able to make a 】change togethe【r\.”Share 【t【his a】rticl/eCop/y/paste th\/e article video e/mbed link b/elo【w:C/opyShareTwee【tSharesendShar【eTweetSharesen【dMoreHideShareSend/ShareShareShareSendShar/eShareYou/ might als/o like 】 The appetite for l\ocal sustain】abl】e food【 p【ro/duce in the U/nited Arab 【Em/irates 【 【 \ \ 【 \ New era【 for B【enidorm as r\esort embraces sustainabili/ty 【 \ \ Health innovations - the 】young Europe【ans /dreaming up c//re\ative solutions for healthca】r\e 】 More 【aboutR【e】cycl】i】ngEnvironmental 【protectio】/nDub【ai /United Arab E/mirat\es】 Most viewe/d / 】 【 【 【 / 【 Beijing is their campus: Insid【e the Chines【e capital’s life-ch/anging stud/y tours \ \ / 9 places to visi】t on your【 cul/t】ural trip around】 Croatia // \ 【 \ \The Palm J\um\eirah: Du/bai�【39;s symbol of cre【ativity and ambiti/on 】 \/Market】s, coffee and stre】et【 /art: discove/ring Zagreb's secret delights 【】 】 【 】 \ \ \ Greek islands of his【tory and culture 【 】 \ \ \/ Br\owse today�】39;s 】t【agsGxMc

XavZSwedish env【ironmental【 activist Greta Thunber/g ha/s 】been speaking about her trip across /the/ Atlantic o【】n an envi】ronmentally-friendly 【yacht. She said the 【/journe【y on the zero-em【is\sions vessel】 "wo】ul【d be challengi/【】ng for 】everyone abo/ard".Thu\nberg will travel on\ t【he/ M/alizi】a II &m】das\h; a\ ra【cing boat fitte\d with solar panels 】and underwa\ter【 t\urbines that generates no carbo【n emissions — to attend the two United Nat\ions【 cli【\ma/\te conference/s in New York and Santiago,】 【Chile. Thunbe\rg】, who re】fuses to take【 aeroplanes because of the/ir imp\act on \the environment, sa】】id the trip would be "qui【te the advent/ure" 】and that【 she "expected it to be 】c【hallenging at tim/es" dur【ing a press confe/rence before her d\eparture.She】 will be joined on the【 jour/n【e【y, which should take around two weeks, by her fathe】r. They will make the cross】in/g with 【captain B\【】oris Herrmann, Pierre Casiraghi,【 th\e grandson Monaco’s late Prince】 Rain\ier III, as well as Natha【n】 Grossman, a document】ary \maker from S\weden.The 】teenag】er said she didn't feel bad\ or a】nxious during t【e】st runs and/ that she only 】exp\erien】/ced seasicknes】s for a few minutes befor\e i】t went away.Ask】ed what sh/e hoped t【o accomplis/h】 with her t】rip, Thunberg \said she hoped to "inc\/re\/as】e】】 awarenes\s amon/g 【peo\ple in general\ so \【【they sta/rt realising /that we are in a【】n【\ emergency."Supporters of the teen\ activist shared their support for her on/ social/ media."The/ yacht【 she will be\ sailing on is a ra【cing yacht and \it is anything but c【o】mfortable. And 】even in a comfortable y】acht】 crossing the Atlantic is no /picn】ic. You g】o girl! Big cudos for finding an alt【ernative to flying【!" wrote one/ user.The Swede said previou/sly that s】he wanted to at\tend】 the summit in New Yo\rk on September 23 b【ut didn'/t k】now h/ow to ge】】t there \without going by plane or cruis\e ship\, \w【hich both have high emissions."Taking a boat】 to/\ No】rth Ame【rica i/s 】b【as【ically im【po\ssible," she 】was\ cite\d by AP as saying.Thunberg took the oppo/rt】un【ity to thank the Mal】\izia II crew】 for helping her w/】ith her /project.According \to Germ【an n\/onprofit Atmos\fair, roundtrip from 【London to New/【 York gener/ates on average【 986kg of CO per pa【ssenger. While the Mal/izia II 】】runs on sola\r-powe\r and und】erwater \turbines\ generating el\ectr【ical p】ow/er with 【zero carbon emissions.It is not k\nown how Th//】u【nberg, 】who is ta【k/ing a sabbatical i/】n t\he US, will ret】urn to Europe.Share \this articleS\【hareTwee\tShar\e【send/ShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSend【Share\S】h/\areSha\reSendS/h\areShare/You migh//t【 also li/【ke / / / 】 \ Watch: Gre】ta Thunber】g sails into New York for UN】 climate \change【 summits【 / 【 'Shock&\#039; as s【【cienti【】sts find 【plastic \microbead【s in /remote Arc/tic ice】 \ 【【 \ 】 Is Christma】s d/】estroyin\g the planet? \ / 【More abou\tGreta ThunbergEnvironmen\tEnvironmental protection Browse today�【39;s tagsFzCM

1.14p4Ocean【【o】gr\a】phe\r and envir】onmentalist, Jean-Mi】\chel Cousteau, p【a】id/ his f/irst visit to th/e United Arab Emira【tes as 】part of his edu】cation【al conservation programm】e.During hi/s s\tay in the\ emi【rates, Co/ust\eau spoke/ /to more th】an 100 s【ch/oo/l children【 a】b\out the world\&r】squo;s fragile aqu【a【tic ec】osystem.&/ldquo;If you protect the ocean/, y【ou【 】/protec【【t/ yourself,”】 he told the】 you】ng a【udien\ce.】The interactive lear【ning initiativ【e is part of Co】ust\eau’s O【cean Futures Society, which he fo】unded in 1999 with the intention of giving “a voice to the ocean.”Je\a\n-Michel Cousteau teaches【 kids in/ 】th/】e UAE ab【out o】cean c/onse\r【vationABO】UT JEA\N-MICHEL COUSTEAUCoustea】u&rsquo\;s interest in \con】serving t/he \waters of/ the wo】rld b/egan around the ag【e】 of seven when he/ was /t【aken divin】g by his f【a【ther, the re\nowned explorer, fi/lmmaker and scienti】st Jacq【ues-Yve/s】 Couste\au.In /an 】interv【iew【 with Euron【ews, Jean-Michel sai/d that /it/ was his【 family which\ encouraged him\【 to share knowledge 】and start dialogues【 with】 】people to/ spread his ecological 】message.“I【've/ learned a lot of that fro\m my fath\er,&\r【dquo; h\e says.\ &ld/quo;You\ never【, n【ever criticize. Forget about\ that. 【You neve\r【/ point a finger】,】 bec】ause when you point a finger there are th/ree coming back at you.”“You try to have an oppo/r】tunity \to meet and then you ca【n reach each】 o】ther'/s\ h/earts,&rd【【quo; \he added.During h/is long 】career, 81-year-old Cousteau ha\s【 directed more than 80 【films/ and do\c】ume/ntaries, all themed】 on】 sa】fegu【arding the future of t】he planet’s se/as and oc【eans.His current \researc/h e】】xplores how ho//l/i【day resorts】 can minimize thei\/r environmental impact a【nd he recently campaigne/d aga/i【nst the captivi\ty of 100 whales 】\in Russia.Je【an-Michel C】ou/st/eau durin/g inter/view wit/h/ EuronewsWhilst】 plastics are/ a hot topic when i】t com\es t【o/ the 【poll/ution of glob】al ocea】ns, Cousteau is flagging up\ the【 haz】ards of lesser】-know】n】 【wa】】st【e prod\ucts tha】t end up 】in/ our water\wa】ys.】“There are\ hundreds of differen/t/ chemicals,” h\e says/. “\【You take a t】ablet】 of as\pirin and hopefully, it takes care of your headache, [but] where is that chemical going? Righ【t into t】he ocean.&rdquo【;】Cousteau also \highlighted /how p】olluted 】wat\ers had an affect on the human body,\ citing his【 own rece/nt m/edi【\】cal assessment for leve\ls of toxicity.“I was tested with 32 differ】ent t【ypes of chemicals a【nd two types \of heavy 】metal/s,” he revea/led.Jean-Michel Cous/teau /divin\gAs fo/r how to cur【b or elimi\nate dest】ructive environ】ment【/al factors, Co【usteau s/】a\id he bel/ieves that 【better management of natur/al resources【 wa】s 】key.\“/There are hug】e opportunities now to capture all these 】/runo/ffs,&【rdquo; he remarke】d. &\ldquo;And 【we can make】 money doing that because in nature there's n/o was/te, everything is a re【source.”Whils\t s/howing no signs of re/ti【ring】 from his passion of aq】ua】tic conserva【ti】\on, C/o/\uste】/au beli\eves【 that the future of his work is safeg/uarde/d by his son and daughter who are also involve/d\ in the\ 【scientifi\c disci/pline and “heading in the right dir【ection.&rdqu\o;SEEN ON SOCIAL: EXPLOR\ING THE REG\ION’S WATERSEkaterina from 【\Russia 【po【sted a picture of her d/ive to 【a ship wr\eck in Sudan. View 【this post on Inst\agramUnd【erwater SWAT. U【m\bria wreckA post shared by Katerina Kali/nina (@【guzuguzu】) on Mar 8/, /20【17 at 10:57am PST【And Andri\y fro【m U\kraine went\ 】for a dive with】 red fish in Egypt’s Re/d【 Sea\. View this 】post 】on InstagramLifeti】me memories ?&】z】wj;&\#9794;️???A pos/t shared by &\#1040;n【drey Deniskin (@a.\deniskin11) on May 18, 2019 at 8:02am PD】TShare this articleCopy/paste the 【a\rticle video embed l\in/k【 below:CopyShare】Tw】eetSharesen\dShareTweetSharese】ndMore】/\HideShareSendS/h\areShar/eSh】ar【eSend】ShareSh】areYou might also like \ \ Watch: 【Woman set /for epic/】 journey /f/lying migration route 【of endangered【 osprey / 【 / 】 Global energy dem】a】nd deba【/te\/d 】at 【Abu Dhabi Sustainabilit【y Week 】 /】 \ How 】is th【e UAE tackling its food【 waste problem? 】 // More abou\tEnvironmental protectionEcology【Oc【ean【United Arab Emi【rates 【 Browse today's tagskvdb

2.i7Qj\This week, in a quiet street\ in【 the Norwegian har【bour town o【f Bergen, officials from E】U member states \【an】d No【rway/\/ will hole up in the\ Fisk【【er/idirektorate】t, or Fisheries D\irectorate, to decide the size of the fish 【pie to【 get divided \out between them from so-called &【ld】quo;shared \stocks.” This &ldqu【o;consulta】tion,” as /it is known, happ\ens a【way from pub】l/ic scr/utiny. Yet】, fishing indu/st】ry l【obby【ists are a【llowe/【d i/n where they get to 【cosy up t】o d\elegat【es, while civil so】ciety re/presentatives are 】- qu\ite l】itera【lly - /left out in the cold. These】 annual gat/herings are even more secretive th/an the【 EU AGRIFISH \council meetings, which were re【cently【 investigated by th【e E/U 【Ombudsman 【and found to/\ be】 /】lackin【g in transparency.EU-Norway【 consultations c/o/nsiste】ntly res\】ult in agree////me\nts to /continue overf【/i】shing. T】his is in no s\\mall part d\ue to a be\wilde\ringly flawe【d a【pproach】: by assuming the scienti【fi】c advice fo【r maximum】 sustai【【nable c【at【【che【s a\s a /s\tart\ing point and then negotiating upwa】】rds. /The 】EU \commit\ted to phase out overfishin/g【【 u\nd】e【r the r/ef】orme】d/ Common【 Fish】eries P/olicy (CFP【) by 2\【015 or, at the absolute\ 【l/atest, by 20. Ye】t【 while the act of catch】】ing\ too many fis】h occurs at\ sea, it is insi\de meetings like/ t/h】is /【where overfishing is \shamelessly agreed up/on and a】pproved\.On 16 Decembe\r in Brussels, EU fisher】ies ministers【 will follow】 up on 】the Norway \“consultations” at the an】nual AGRIFISH Co\uncil meeting, 】where quotas/ f\【or 】/the 【Nort】h East Atlantic w/\ill be fought over into the wee hours \of the night】/. Acc/ording to all the signs, \this year they will again agree\ to overfish several key stocks.The 【recen/t gro/und-breaki/ng IP】/BES Global Asses】sment Report on Bi】od/iversity and Ecosystem Services e【stimated 【humanity is threa【ten【ing a million species with extin【cti【on. Over/fis【hin】g rem/ains the bigges/t imp【act on our【 o/cean. Rebecca【 Hub】bard 】 【 】 \Programm\e Di【\rector at Our Fish The sig/nals? F\】i/sheries ministers /【/have s【\et fishing quo/tas abo【ve\ scie/ntif【i【【c a/dvice in six ou\t of every 10 c【as】es since the CFP was reformed i\n 2013. Th\e AGRIFI/SH Council v【ery rarel【y 【sets fishing quotas at more sustainable leve】ls than the EU Commission proposes. The 【EU】 Commission’s pro\posal for a number of\ North Eas】t Atlantic fish populations for 202【0 are a】lread\y above the scientific a/】dvi\ce, and the c【ontinu】ed politi\cal/ delay \】from\ fisheri】es m】inist/【ers has wors】ened the situ\ation, me【an【ing ministe【rs/ \are now fa】ced 】wi/【th【 proposal/s for dr】ast【ic cuts to some fish such as\ the iconic North S【ea cod.Not on//ly are mini】sters presid】ing over fishing/ limi/ts for/ a declining number of 【fishers\, they are overseeing 【the/ on\going decline of our marin【e resou【rces /instead of making sustainable 【resource mana/gement dec\i\sions 【that would improve the health of th【e ocean and/ secure the futur\e of f【isherpeople an/d 】coastal 】communities.T【\he recent gr\ound-brea\k/ing IPBES Globa\l Assessment Report on Bio】diversity an【d Eco【s【ystem \Services 【【estimated humanity\ is thre】atening a /mi\llio/n species with extinction.\ It also conc】lu\ded that the b】iggest threats \to na】ture are f【rom change】s to l】and\/sea use and over-exploitation. Overf/\ishing\ remains the 【bi【ggest \impact【 on our ocean.But re【m】】oving \the impact/ of overfishing\/ can restore oce/an health /and inc【r】ease/ \its capacit/y t/o m/itigat\e, an\d a【d【a【p\t to, the impacts of climate/ change【. It is therefore a key form/ of c【limate action. This has starte\d to permeat【e in】to p】olicy\. On 19 November【, the EU Council\, i\】n response t【o t/he 】recent/ IPCC Special/【 Report on\ the O\c/ean 】and Cryosphere, appe\ale/d to the EU Commission for policy options in t/he new Gr\een Deal, wh\ile st【a】t】ing the need for 【urgent action 【to \addres】s】 the incr\easin】g threat of climat/e b/r】eakdown to【 the o】\cean an【d marine l】i】fe.So, missing【 the deadline of 20/2/0 puts the EU in di/fficult territory\. It【 places EU fisheries 】ministers in direct】 cont\ravention of/ th/e 【laws that they【, or the【】ir pr/edecesso【rs, 【created a/nd signed up to, and in poten/tial conflict with the】 climate a】ction taken by othe【r ministries within their\ own gove\rnments.When EU fisheries】 】】ministers set annual\ f】\ishing l/imits 【for 2020 on 16 and 17 Decemb/e【r, they must/ deliver on internati/onal/ an/d EU obligations t【o 【end /overfishing. 】 Rebecca Hubbard / Programme Dire\ctor at O\ur Fish 】 / Norway, to】o, h\as inv\ested】\ a great【 deal in/ pro【jectin【g itself \as\ a climate and anti-overf【is【hing cha\【mp/ion,/ when in actu/al f】【act, it/ too, is hypocrit\ical 【on both is\sues】【. On climate, Nor/wa\y 】has made big commitments】 】to become a ‘l\ow-carbon 【so【c【iety&rsq】u/o; but in reali/ty, emi】ssions are decreasing much slower. On】 ov】erfishing, Norway signed up\ to the 【Sustai【nable Development Goals】 【to en/d overfis/hing by 2020, bu】t on【 the water, they received a quota in 2019 large enough to plunder a massive 164,000 tonnes of fish above s\cientifical】/ly advised sust\ainable level\s (equivalent to 21% of its share/d s/toc\k quota with the E【U).W/hile N】orway\ and the EU discus【s h\ow best】 to continu\e ove\rfishing in Bergen】, further south, delegates at the COP25 climate meeting in Madrid focus【 on the ocean, 【in what has been labelled the “Blue COP.&rdq/u/o; With states under pressure to ste/p up their commitments to action on climate, discus\sions will be focusing】 on why there is not more ac/t【ion on oceans【 when【 we know what needs to be done. And it ca】n be done relatively quickly/, a\s 】the longer-【term (but cr】【itical) ac】tion\ of slashing car\bon emis】sions gets underway?Late】r th【i【s month, EU prime min【i\sters】 have an op】portu】nity to g\o public with a】 cle/a/r and \deliverable climate emergency acti/on. W】hen E/U fisher【ies min【isters】 set annual fis\hing limits for 2020 \o】n 16 and 17 December, they must de】liver on int】e【rnat【ional and EU o】bligations to/ end overfishing.Rebecca\ Hubbard i\】s t/he Progra\mme Direct\or/ at Our Fis【h.____________Are you【 a recognised expert\ in you/r field】? At E【uronews,/ we belie】ve all views matt\er. Co\n】t\act us at view@euronews.com to send pitches or submis/sions and be【 p/ar/t of the con】/versation.Share this articleShareTweetSh\aresendShareTw/\eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareShar【eSha】reSe\【ndShareShareYou might also/ like //】 \ / The EU’s G【reen】 Deal p/\lan/s to /restore nat\ure mu/st include our largest e/cosystem - th】e ocean ǀ /Vie【】w 【 / \ 【 \ / 】 】 Scien】t\ists have\ emb\arked from Norway【/ on the lo/ngest-ever exped\itio/n to the 】Arctic / / \ 【 \ \ \ How s/mall sca\le fi\sheries saved Da【nish f】ishi/ng communities Mor】e aboutf【/ishingNorwa/yEuropean U/nionFisheryEnvironmental protectionCOP /5 M】a\drid Browse today's tagsnlUP

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cYmpAl\uis/io Sa/m\pa】io Dos Santos i【n Braz/il, Nixo】n Mutis in Colombia】, Ag\udo// Quill【io in the Philip】pines, Rah\】mat Hakimin/ia in Iran.These a【re s【ome of t】he 164 peopl\e /who los/t th/eir lives for d【e\fe\ndi/ng the environ】ment f】ro\m 'menacing industries' in 2018, said a human rights NGO\.That’s【\ mo\re than three people murdered on average ea】\ch 】week, according to a new \repor【t by UK-based Global Witness rele\ased on【 T/uesday.The 】P】h【ilippi/nes had【 the hig\hest number of\/ /kill/ings o\f any count【ry with at leas【t 30 environment d\efe/nders m/\urdered i【n【/ 2018. This is th】e fir【/st time the\ Asian Pac/ific country is at the t\op 】/of\ the lis】/t\ since the NGO reporting such deaths in 2012.Guatemala\ /recor】ded the sharp\e【st ri【se in murders, which【 jumped more than five-fold — m/aking it】 the deadl【/iest 】country pe】r capita.Europe continues to】 be the less af】fected contine\nt with only three \repor【ted deat】hs/, all of them in 】Uk\raine.Increase in killings relat\ed to conflicts over wat\erIn the【 /9 \cou/ntri【es \surveyed, m】ining was linked to 43 】deaths\. Attacks i\n the ag【/ribusiness sect【or were the se/cond cause of d】eat【h (21 \murders). There was a/ four-fold incr/ease in k【illings related to conflicts over/ w\ater/ in 2018 (17/ \murd/ers)/, underli】ning/ the dead\ly cons\eque】nces of warmer tempera/tures, erratic ra】infall【 and【 d/\iminishing groundwater, parti【cularly i】n Latin A】mer/ica, Africa and South】 Asia】, said the report.The a/tt\acks were connected to\ opposition to/ proliferating hydropower projects, as\ well as corruption in the management of local wa/ter 【sources, Alice Harrison, a ca/mpaigner at【【 Global W】itness, told the Th【oms\on Re/ute】rs Foundation."With climate【 b\rea\kdown and in/creasing【 dro/ught, it is【 hi\】ghly likely that \we'll be【gin to see a 【【rise in co】nflicts over water sources involving 】【w【hoever controls them," s/he added【.Duterte'】s reign\ of terrorHarrison poi/nted ou/t that muc【h of t\he persecution of land defenders was driv/en by the 【demand for land a\nd 】raw materials found in everyda【y prod/ucts, "from fo\od to mobile phones, to jewel【le【ry"."This tr【end on\ly/ \looks 】set to wor【sen as strongmen poli【ticians around the w【o【r\ld【 are stripping away environmental and human r/ights protections to pr】o】mo】te busi/nes】s at any cost," 【she said in a stat【ement.N【earl\y 300 farmers, indigenous people and human r/i【g\hts a\ctivists hav【e\ b】【een kill\e【d si【nce Philippine P\resident 】】【Rodrigo Duterte took o】ff/ice in 2016, accor【ding to Philippine human righ\ts group】s.“The Duterte re/gime/'s inte【nsified militarisation of communit/ies has had cata】s【t/rophic effects," said\ Cristina】【 Palabay,【 secr】】【e\tary-general of lan】【d \right\s group\ Kar【apatan."The exp/anded【 power /given to the police】 a/nd 】the m】】【ilitary has \suppr/essed diss【ent and promoted threa/ts, h/arassment and /attacks a/ga\inst acti\vists a/nd】 human rights defende【rs," sh\e said.Intimidat【i】on of environmental defenders on the riseWhi\le there were fewer deaths re】ported than i】n 2017 (207 in /17) Global Wi【tness also reco/rded the i【\ncreasing use of 【lawsuits, a\rrests/, and\ /death threat【s to【 intimid】ate 【ac】tivists 】】even in develo】ped countries.The\ re】port 【takes t/he\ case of Iran where environmental defe/nders are cons【idere【d to be】 te【/rrorist/s \or 【enemies/ of the state, citing t\he case】 of nine \activists i\mpr】isoned on spyi\ng\ cha/rges.Global Witness also note】d the \repression of anti-fracki\ng protests in the UK】\】 by \changing so\me national laws to ban cer\ta\/in demonstrations.The \NGO called out the rol】e of investors — li】ke development 【banks — play in facilitating the violati】on of\ activis\ts' rights to protest.S\ha】re this articleShareTweetSharesendShareTweetShare【send/MoreHide【ShareS】【e/n//dShareShareShareSendShareSh\ar\eYou m\igh/\t also like / 【 \ Watc【\h: Farmers create 【natural straw intend to break plastic�】39;s back \ \ / 【 / 】 EU's youngest com】m【issi\o/ner on how to turn cli/mate crisis around 【 / / / \ 】 】 'Inc【redible win for n】ature】9;: Plans】 to drill in Great/ Australi【an Bight abandoned 】 】 More aboutE/nviro【nme【ntEnvironmental pr】ot\ectionEnvironme】ntal \i/ssues \ \ B【row\se today�/39;s tagsjgfm

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LdFMText sizeA【aAa/C【16 Bioscie/nces is the 【New York based/【 s\tartup producing a synthetic vers】ion of\ 】palm oil that\ doesn&\rs】quo;t rely on defore【station. The compan\y has j】ust recei】【ved a 20 millio】/n d】ollar 'series A' invest】m\ent round from Bill Gates’ Breakthrough /Energy Vent【\ure\s fund.\The \inve\stor-l/ed fun】d\ sup/ports 】cut】ting edge startups wi/t】h【 a focus on en\vironmental innovation an【d sustainabil【ity. Hence, the decision to invest in conflict-free palm /oi/l【 goes hand in \hand \with its commitment to /】/b】ack 】"companies that 【will help stop clim】a\te change." A\ 'series A' inve/s】tment is】 usually offered to a】 business/ which has alrea】dy develo【p】ed \a trac/k record /of success, as 【o/pposed to 'pre-seed' or 'seed' stages of funding which occur ear】lier in a company's lifesp【an.The synthetic pa//lm oi\l produced by C16 Biosciences /i】s /bio-based \】and \is brewed from microb/es throug】h a/ fermentation process【.Est&eacu\te】;e】 Lauder launch】es sus【tai】【na/ble scheme to tackle palm oil prod/\uctionMa【laysia/n sup\ermarket fights back to】/ ‘pr【ot】ect/ the re/putation’ of palm o\i/lForest fires /prove eco-friendly palm oil/ 'is a 【c/on'/】, says Greenpea】ce\Palm oil alternat\ive brewed like beerPalm oil exists in the【 majorit/y】 of ho【use【hold /produ】cts b\oug\ht in the】\ supermarket, \f/rom frozen piz/\zas and biscu/i\ts to sham/poo【, toothpaste a】n\d lipstick. While it is 】a versatile /vegetable \oil, deriving from/ th/e fruit o】f \oil-palm tre/es, it is one o\f the majo】r drive【rs o/f【 deforestation wo【rldwide, according to/ WWF. Destroying the world’s for\ests in order to 】obtain【\ 【it is/ not only w\r/ecking】 wildli】fe\ habitats, home to orangutans,/ elephants an】【d rh【inos, it is 】remo【vin【】g the ability of trees/ to absorb car】bon 】emi/ssions.Most cosm】\etic prod【ucts contain palm/ oilUnsplashFor \a】 concerne】d team at C16 Biosciences, there see【med like no o【\ther opti\on but to come \up with a 【【sust\ainable\【【 oil【 alternative to roll ou】t on a la】rge scale. "\We came up /with the i】dea beca【use we wit/nesse/d the mass/【ive scale【 of destruct/ion caused by palm oil deforestation first-hand," CEO Shara Ticku tells Eurone/ws Living."I was working i】n Sing】apore in 2013, which wa】s one of the worst ye】ars\ on re】cor】d for the 】fi【res in I【nd/onesia. T】he Air Quality Index (A】QI) was over 400, and over 0】 is c\onside/red】 toxic, a】nd pregnant women were restricted from goin\g outsi/de," she \continues. Shara says sh\e soon learnt that th/ese\ conseque\nces were d】irectly 】caused by \the need to】 clea【r the land\ for 】palm /o【il/ p】lantations and 【s/a\ys, "I simpl\y couldn't understand how we【 just】ified burning the planet to ma/】ke a v【egetable【 oil.】"As a/ resu【lt, C16 Biosc\】iences was born and Sh/ar\】a started /bre【win\g p/alm /oil li/k\e beer usin/g biotechnology. The company【 state,【 “fermentation is a well-pr】oven commercia【】l process tha】t has been used f\or c【enturies to convert raw mate】ri\als】 into consumable co】mmercia\l pro】ducts】 consumed by】 billions of /people【\ every d【\ay,” addin/g “our\ palm oil is sustainable.&r/dquo;I\n an offi【cial statement】, Carmichae\l R【/\o\berts of Break/through Energy Vent【ures, call】\【s the produc/t a\n【 "elegant bioman/ufacturing solut/ion /for p/alm oi【l r/eplacement" claiming that /it puts the c\ompany in a go\/od position to capi【tali【s】e on t】he “】growing need for sustainable, low-carbon bio-substitutes.”Will the alterna】tives ever re【plac【e t】he original?S/u/stainable palm【 o\il【 has \b\een criticised of late\ by The\ Ro】undtable on【 Sustaina/ble Palm】 Oil】 (RSPO) as &\ldquo;\a】 con” as there are q】uestions aroun】d how the oil can\ be grown in an environ/men/t\ally friendly way.P】alm 【oil that is grown and certified ag\ain】st the eight RSPO pri】nci】ples is based】 on stringent sustainability 】crit【eria relating to s/ocial, en/vironmental and eco/nomic good practice. But in November 2019【, Greenpeace relea\sed /its Bur】】ning Down /】the House rep\【or/t,【 finding that\ memb【ers of the /【RSPO had been at the centre of a /series of Indonesi\an forest f】】ires.\Fo【rest \of pal\m treesUnspl/ashAs a result, synthetically produ\ced palm oil might be an】 】improved s】o【l】ution. “Sus/tainabl/【e certification schemes and zero-deforestation commitments from big agri【business have fail\ed t】o【 live up】 to the/ hype,&rdqu/o; conf】irms J\oe Ei/sen, Executive Direct\o】r/ of the】 Rai【nforest /Foundation UK.&/ldquo;】Alternatives such as C16 【Biosciences c/an be part of 】the/ solution but th/ere are no】 gua\rantees】 this can be a like-for-like replacemen】t for cheap and di\rty palm oil from tropical f\orests. [] Care must 】also \【b/e paid to the possible impacts on\ mill【ions of smaller-holders for whom pal/m 】oil is a 】main sourc【e of】 livelihood,&rdquo【; he concludes.Anna Jones, He【ad// of 】Fo\rest/s at Greenpeace\ UK con【curs, sayi\ng t/hat the \charity is "not against/ u/【s【ing new tech【nol】ogies to p/r/oduce \food including palm oil" provided that the \techniqu【es 【and raw mate】ri\als used "do/ not negat/ively impact the envi\ronment or peopl【e."Share this\ art【ic】le More f/rom】 lifeKaE7

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P9vC“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207A fish\y】 b/usiness: EU poli\ticians are risking o】ur fu【t【ure by 】gambling on our nat】】ural resource/s | View 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagscS8C

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KT17How to have a fl\ying free holida\y and】 【reconnect wi/th natur】ebODR

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6aTrTe】xt size【A/aAaA【 group of British women ar【e set to\ prove th/\at in t\he【 UK, where the economy once has be/en s【haped by the textile】 i\ndustry/, it is s【till commercially viable to re\-【crea/te a l【ocal, r【esilient texti】l\e economy. They a【im to offer an】 al【ternat】ive to/ th】e \u【nsustainable global textile produc\ti【on s】ystems which /hav】e threatened /traditional British cloths almost to /exti】nction.The project takes place】, of cours\e, in Bristol the UK’【s greene\st city, the European Green Capital in/ 2015. I】n tha\t year the loca/l weav】in\g mill start\ed operating, it was the firs】t /industr】ial\ loo】m to open in the ci【t\y in almost a century.\ Th\is m【ill has be/】com\e part of /the Bristol Cloth proj/e】ct, a fabric manufacture】r to produce the UK's\ first rege\nera【tive/ non-toxic tex】tile."The】 f\arm 【we source the wo\o/l from - Fernhill fa【rm 】- uses “holistic farm\in\g&rdqu\o; techniques, it means mimick】ing natural \herd \grazing\ pattern【s," explai\ns【 the bac】k【ground \B\ab/s Beha\【n, the F【【oun/ding Director of Bri】stol Cloth project &a【mp】; Botanic【al 】Inks. "Lots of /animals】 ar【e kept together in one area 】putting lots \o/f 【nutri【/e【nts back into the soil. 】T【hey are however moved o\n quickly s【【o always have fresh new pasture to 【graze\ on. The pl\ants in th【e soil get a long time until t】h\e\ /herd 【ret】urn/ to that place. Meaning\ tha】【t a diverse speci\es\ of \pl【ants get【 to grow - all putting a varie/ty of nu/trients an\d mine【rals into the soil【. And they get【 to grow tall and /therefore also\ get deep roots,【 and t】hi】s is what makes them】 able to capture more/ car\bon from t】he air and lock it back into the soi\l- this is wh】at makes i】/t carb/on sequestering and climate neutralising."Anot\【he】r important part of 】th/e proc】ess i\s using natural m】ater\ia/ls for the colouring, such/ as plants, minerals and in【sect\s. \(A/ro/und the world,】 \an estimate【d 17 t/o 20% of industrial water】 pollution comes fro\m textile dyeing and treatment an【d an est】imated 8】,000 synthetic chemic【als are us/ed to turn raw mat/erials into 【\te【x/tiles, many /o/f which will be releas/ed into f】re/shwater sourc\es.)【As the clo/th is made from natural fibre and plant\ 】d】\yes and no toxic synthetic c】/h【emica/ls, i\t is safe 】t/o go back i】n/to the ground after i\t’s u】sef/ul life cycle and actually o/\】ffer nutrients back/ to// the soil.The project has r/aised more than £12,】000【 v\ia a crowdfunding ca/mp】aign to produce the first 200 metres of the Bristol 【Cloth/.\】Cli/ck on the/】 video above to lear\n more about /the proje】ct.Share th】is article 【 Mor\e from style3VLY

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T89JText sizeAaAaWalking】 along the shore of the Dead Sea give【\【s you a c\lear vision of how 【qui\/ckly【 na/ture \reacts to】 human intervention. The\ Dead S/ea h/as been dying for de\cades,\ and】 the result is \al/ready obv】ious.Nestled betwee】n Israel and the Palestinian T【erritories 】and /Jordan, /the Dead Sea has been le\aving its mark /【【on mankind since biblical times. Famous for its extreme sa】】linity, /an/ Israeli a】r/tist 【has even】 been i【nsp【ired by that and use t/he\ expanse as【 her stu】dio\ to create cry/stal art pi\eces.Since the histori【cal lake has be【en exploited by modern indus】try, the【 wate【r】 】level is【 g】radually lowering. T【he m【iner/al extraction and the diversio\n of the \Riv/er Jord【an&r\s】/quo;s/ water /have been\ big c/ontributors to the phenom】enon.】As the sp\ectacularly shrinki\ng wat\er level leaves it】s mar】k on the shore,\ d\angerous sinkholes appear al【ong the lake - the 】】result of \the br】iny wat/e\r r/ecedin/g unde【rgrou】nd. /In 199【0 th】e】re were a little 】over 100/ sinkholes, accordi\ng to the Geological/ Survey o\f Israel. Today the】re are more t/】h/an【 6,000. This led 【to the n】ecessary clo/【sure【\ of some s【hore seg【ments hence those tourist spots became ghost to】】wns.Click on th】e video above \to learn more ab】out what happens with the Dead/ S】【【ea.Share this【 article 】 More\ from plac/es56zd

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0hrcText si】zeAaAaThere’s no \doubt about it: /art, in its many forms, is so \much mor/e than a \kind /of s】elf-【express】ion. It 】can often be【 a force for good and much-ne/eded \chan【ge. From photography t】o lively discussion and jaw-dropping footage,/ t\hese are【 the exhibitions and documentar/ies on 【climate change around the \world/ to have on your r\a/d【ar f【or May】 2019.A】r\t + Climate/ = Change FestivalWhere】: Various, Melbourne, Australia\When: Until 19 May 2019This exciting initi\ative is a month-long festi】val 】l/ooking at the way】s 】in w】hich a】rt can make\ a diffe/rence in the】 discussion around sustainabi/li】ty and climate change. This i】s/ a s【eries of curated \exhibitions, artist t【alks and lectures w【ith some o【f【 the most p\romi】nent environment and climate ch】a\nge 】scientists, psycho\lo\gists and res【earchers】 /t\hat aims to open \】【up di/s\cussi】on】 on the wa】ys in\ whi\ch art ca】n work a/【\s an a】cti】vism【 to\o【l. This will be running in Victoria,\ Australia, but /man】y of the talks will be\ filmed, mea【ning you don’t】 have to be in the country to get involve/d wi/th this excit/ing moveme\nt.More infoClimate Change: The\ F\/acts with David AttenboroughNet】work: BBC iPla【yerWhen: Ava【ila\ble /from Ap】【ril 2019If you’ve yet to w/atch \t\his grou】ndbr【eaking BB【C /docu\ment【ar】y, now&rsquo\;s the ti\me. Presented b】y\ t】he world&rsq\uo;s】 most/】【 】resp】ected wi\ldlife doc】ume\ntary m【aker, Dav】id Attenborough cuts through the fake news】 and confu/si】ng statist\ics\ to/ bring 【us the tru】th about what is \act\ually happening to】 \our environment/\. In th】is 】hour-long progr\/amme, issues s】uch as/ sp/ecies extinction【s, deforestation and extreme wea\ther a【re all tackled. Though it i【s som【ewh\at 】harrowing - and worryin】g - to w/atch, there is an /o/verall message of h/op】e:】 that we ha【ve the pow\er/ \to t【urn the tid\【e o/【f 】cli】mate chan/ge /once】 an【d for all.More infoAltered OceanWhere【: The Royal Phot/ographic【 Society, Bristol, U】KWhen: U/ntil\ 23 】June 2019According to statist【ic【s, approxim\ately 8 million\/】 pieces of 【plastic find 【】their way into \the ocean every day. Da/vi/d Attenboroug/h brought th/e i\ssue of p\lasti【c pollu\tion to the forefront b】ack in 2017 with h/is BBC documen】t\ary, Blue】 Plane【t II 【and it has now become one the major climate change /discussi】ons】 between cou\ntries and local communiti/es. 【I/】】n 【this 【pho【to series, Mandy Barke【r has doc【】】ume】nted\ her findings as】 a ph【otog】rapher travelling the world. Comb】ined wit【h resea【【r\ch n【o/tes, /sk/etchbooks and scient/ific s\amples, it combines both art andscience to p【resent a we\l/l-rou【nded exhibition that forces th\e viewer 】to confront t【he realities our oceans are fa\c\i/ng.More infoHuman/ Natu/re】W【here: Muse【um of World Cultu】re, Gothenburg, SwedenWhen: Until M\ay 2020Bringing toge\/ther 【a collection /o/f】 poignan】t photographs】, w/orks o【f 【art an】d other a】\rchived materials, the Museum of Worl/d Cul【ture has curated an exhib【\iti【on that explores the way h/uman lives ar【e di/\rectly affecting th】e planet. Looking \at/ everything from the【 things we \choose to repair and care fo\r versus those we sim/pl\/y consume, as well as sci\entific results in/ envi】ronme\ntal p【sy】chology, it&rsq】uo;s a /fascinat\ing s\tu【dy of th】e relationship between people and the \planet we call ho/me. T【hough it doe【s feed t【h\e visitor some uncomfortable truths,【 the overall m【/essage is one of //hope】, she\dding light on m/a【ny of the positive initiati/\ves tackling to redu/ce o\u\r impact and offering p/racti/cal tips that c【a【n be taken away and in\corpora【ted into 【daily life.Mor】e i【nfoCarmig【nac P\hoto】j//ou】rna】lism Award: Arctic/: New FrontierWh】ere: Sa/atch/i Gal】lery, Lond【on, UKWhen: Until 6 】M\a【y 2019Photographers Yuri Kozyrev an/d Kadir van Lohuize】n have won the S\aatchi 】Ga【ll/e\ry&rs】quo;s ninth Carmignac Photojournalism Award for the\ir project on the Arctic. Widel】y view】ed as 】one of the most enda\ng【ere】d 【ar】】eas in the world, the Arctic【 】is home to 】the Nenets - a nomadi【c】 group that make the yearly m/igration a\cross Nort【h【ern】 Russia. F【o/r \the first t【ime e】v\er, \their journey was i/nterrupted by melt/ing frost in 2018. K】ozyrev f】ollowed【【 their progress this year and bore witness 【to the impact【 t/hat global/ warming is h【avin\g on /their lifest/yle. Lohuizen,】 on the other h】【and, /visited various part\s of the【 w\orld,】 meeting with sc】ientists, envir\onmenta】lists and vulnerable com】munities /to find out ab】out the reality of/ 【what is happening to our m/elti】ng ic【e ca\p\s.\ Each photo in t\he e/xhibition shows the sta\rk reality facing t】his part o【f the world thank//】s to t\ourism, the depleti/on of gas an】d natural resources and heavy ocean p【oll/ution.More infoWords: Bianca /Barr\attShare this arti/cle 【 / More f】\rom lifeUUzB

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5DfyFor】 the first time\ E/【U Finance Min【ister】s are calli/ng【 on the European Investment Bank to halt funding of oil, gas 【and coal projects.Mika/ Lintilä【;, 】【min【iste】r of financ【e of Finland s\aid:&l】dquo;Since 2013, 】w\e \have /m\ore 【tha\n doub【l/e/d o\ur fina【ncia】l c\on】tributions\ to h【elp developing countr【i\/es reduce th【ei】r gr】eenhouse gas emission】s【 and c】ope with the imp/act of climate change. “But it is the\ 【European Inve】st】ment Bank that is right in the heart of/ /the so-called European Green dea】l】 - 【an ambitious p\lan announced 】by t\he Com\mission&rsq/uo;s n/ew】 President.The EU finance ministers&rsquo【; /call comes】 as a crucial mov\e in t/】he【 run up to the COP/, the UN climate change conference./ Within 】the p\rop】osed Green/ Dea】l 【- which the new Commi】】ssion 】promised to frame within t】he f/irst 100 days the Eu\ropean Investment Bank will 【be in c【harge\ with fi】nancing the transition.The \European Investment Bank i【s】 set 【/to /turn into European Climate B\ank."There is【 a very im】po\rtant【 aspect of tra】nsiti】on. and we】 h/ave seen that o】n all protests, n】ot onl\y /young\/ peo【\ple, but also yellow ves\ts,"/ explai】ns Na\ncy S【aich, EIB Chief climate cha/nge expert continuing, "If we don&r【squo;t ad\dress peo\ple's live/lihoods, they j】ob】s, if thei/r jobs are at ri/sk 】be【c【ause t/hey are working in coal 】or they a/re worki/ng in a high em/i】\tting indust/ry - /if we don’t take that into account a/nd don’t give them opportun\ities 【for w【【ork and jobs in the futu\re】 - then we will not be ad】dr【essing everybody. We have to do this in an incl\usive way. And try to leave nobody behind/."9\】3% of European】s think clima】te ch\ange is a serious probl】em.Ac【cording to the/ r\ecent E】urobarometer research, climate chang【e has overtaken in/ternat\ional terrorism as the second most seri【ous pro】bl】e】【m afte\r 】poverty,\ hunger and/ lack of drinki\ng waterShare this articl【eShareTweetSha/resendShareTwe】\et】Sharesend【M【oreHideShareSe\ndSh\ar】eShareShareSendShareShareYou migh【t also li】ke 【 【 \ 【 Nort】h-south div】ide sta\ll/s EU de\cisi】\on 【on coron【avirus financial pack/age 】 】 【 / EU p/roject in danger if no solidar/ity on coro【navirus cris\i】s, says economy chief Gent/iloni】 【// 】 \ / 】 / \ 】 【/ C】OV】ID-19: EU leaders fail/ to agree on comm】on financi】a/l respo\nse dur\ing virtual summit 【 / More a【boutEurope【an /UnionEn//ergyE/nvir\onme/ntal protectionBanking Br【owse today's/】 tags7GMX

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